Partners - Non-Profit and Service Organizations

  1. YPLW is an informal group of public and private organizations working to conserve and protect critical habitat in the Greater Yamhill Watershed. The GYWC has been a member of the YPLW since its founding in 2008.
  2. The YPLW is currently working with the Columbia Land Trust to implement a land-trust feasibility study for Yamhill County, funded through the Land Trust Alliance. The results of the study will be available soon, but the process of this project has already developed partnerships with new conservation partners and strengthened existing local relationships. Thank you YPLW and CLT for this important opportunity to build expand and bolster land protection activities in the GYW.
  • Cheahmill NPSO was formed in 1998 and has conducted a variety of educational and restoration programs. Currently, the Cheahmill runs monthly educational speaker events from September through May each year at the Carnegie Building in the McMinnville Public Library.
  • Native Plant Garden The Cheahmill NPSO maintains (and helped develop) a beautiful Native Plant Demonstration Garden at the McMinnville Public Library. The garden had a humble beginning, started in 1983 as an effort by Marie Caughran, then library director, to make use of concrete planters sitting empty near the library entrance. 
  • NPSO Restoration Partnership The Cheahmill Chapter has worked with us to improve riparian, wetland, and prairie habitats in public parks across the GYW, including Deer Creek County Park, McMinnville Rotary Club’s Tice Park Nature Preserve, Wrex Kruse County Park, Ed Grenfell County Park, and Roger’s Landing County Park. Thank you NPSO members for all of your work to improve the watershed with us!
  • CLT is a superb organization working to protect and restore habitat across the Northwest in Columbia River tributaries and shores. CLT has a smaller footprint in Yamhill County as compared to their other service areas, but provides great support  for our local organizations working on land protection activities.
  • CLT recently conducted a study on considerations/feasibility for starting or expanding land trusts, funded through the Grey Family Foundation and Land Trust Alliance. They used Yamhill County as the study area! Results are pending distribution, but the study has strengthened partnerships among our local organizations and built new relationships with others. Thank you CLT for choosing our watershed area for this project!
  • DU is actively engaged in the GYW, most recently through Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA's) Willamette Wildlife Mitigation Program (WWMP).
  • South Yamhill Floodplain Conservation Area, (2014) DU partnered with a local landowner and BPA’s WWMP to establish a conservation easement on a 90-acre floodplain on the Yamhill River near Amity. The site provides important wetland, riparian, and oak woodland habitats. In addition to the long-term protection of the conservation easement, DU will restore the area, including 33 acres of seasonal emergent wetlands, 16 acres of forested wetlands, and six acres of oak savanna. Thank you DU for working to protect and restore priority habitats in partnership with our local landowners!
  • Wings and Waves indoor waterpark connects patrons and our community members to water and watershed issues through multi-media, murals, a hands-on museum, and local community events and presentations.
  • Wings and Waves has been a great supporter and partner of community outreach programs with us. In 2014 we collaborated for an inaugural annual Wings, Waves, and Watersheds event bringing together more than a dozen local watershed education organizations and businesses together for a day of free family fun watershed education activities for the public. In 2013, W&W hosted a free public presentation on the challenges our local fish face throughout their life cycle, with guest presenter Tom Murtagh, our ODFW District Fish Biologist. Thank you W&W for partnering with us for fun and educational watershed programs!
  • The GGWC is a neighboring watershed council working out of West Salem. While we haven’t partnered for projects yet, we have worked together to share ideas, resources, and technical assistance. Thank you GGWC for your contributions to watershed health.
  • IAE is a regional leader in habitat restoration, conservation research, ecological education, native seed and propagation technical assistance, and a new estuary technical assistance program.
  • Annual Fundraiser IAE’s annual dinner in the fall is something not to miss! Professional chefs turn a smorgasbord of invasive plants and animals into tasty delights just for you. From nutria, to Japanese knotweed, get your tickets early, this is one of the most fun and creative annual fundraisers in the valley. And you can pick up your own invasive species cook book while you’re there!
  • LWC is a member of the Willamette Valley model watershed program and a regional leader in conservation in their service area. Along with the GYWC, the LWC is a Board member of the statewide Network of Oregon Watershed Councils representing the watershed Councils of the Willamette Valley. In recent years, LWC has provided invaluable technical support and encouragement to the GYWC. Thank you LWC for your engagement at the state level for watershed Councils and for all of your support for the GYWC!
  • Mac Rotary is a local extension of a worldwide service club designed to bring together businesses and professionals to support humanitarian causes, encourage leadership skills and ethics, and promote goodwill.
  • Tice Park In the late 90’s, McMinnville Rotary Club partnered with the City of McMinnville to develop a 27-acre nature park at the City-owned Tice property. The park supports wetland, upland forest, and floodplain habitats, including Baker Creek which is listed habitat for imperiled winter steelhead. Tice Woods Nature Preserve now has 1.5 miles of trails and boardwalks, multiple overlooks, and restroom facilities.
  • Since 2013, the Rotary Club have partnered with us to engage local community members and rotary members in helping to control noxious weeds at Tice Park, including blackberry and English Ivy. Down the road, we hope to plant the site with native species and maybe even take a shot at tackling some of the reed canary grass in the wetlands. Thank you Rotary Club for developing this park and involving us in its stewardship.
  • ANWS is one of the most long-standing fisheries conservation groups in the Pacific Northwest. Supported and lead by anglers in Oregon, Washington, and Idaho, the ANWS is a unique group working to ensure local, native fisheries continue for generations to come.
  • Fish Passage Barrier Fixed on North Yamhill River Tributary (2013). The Newberg Chapter ANWS awarded a grant to the Yamhill SWCD as matching funds for an OWEB grant project to replace a fish passage barrier culvert with a bridge. The bridge project restored access to ~ 1 mile of habitat for ESA-listed winter steelhead and naturalized Coho Salmon in an unnamed tributary to the North Yamhill River.
  • Since 2013, the Newberg Chapter has partnered with us on volunteer-led spawning surveys for winter steelhead and Coho salmon. The Chapter has also hosted annual spawning survey training sessions led by ODFW’s District Fish Biologist, Tom Murtagh. Thank you Newberg Steelheaders for working with us to develop this important monitoring and community outreach program!
  • OEC is a unique state-wide conservation nonprofit working on multiple levels: policy and legislation, teaching individuals how to make a difference, and educating businesses, farmers, and health providers on sustainable practices.
  • Passage of the Pesticide Stewardship Partnership Budget (2014). OEC was a key player in uniting bipartisan support to establish dedicated and bolstered state funding for the PSP program. This program funds locally-driven projects to monitor pesticide water quality in select watersheds, educate growers and urban communities about the monitoring data results, and promote new technologies and incentives that support practices to reduce pesticides being found in our local waters.
  • The RWC is a neighboring watershed council working out of Dallas. While we haven’t partnered for projects yet, we have worked together to share ideas, resources, and technical assistance. Thank you RWC for your contributions to watershed health
  • Salmon-Safe, is a nonprofit based out of Portland, OR leading the charge for market-based incentives that support clean water for salmon across the west coast. Salmon-Safe has developed third-party certifications that protect and improve habitat for fish and wildlife across a growing list of land practices, from golf courses, large-scale residential developments, business/college campuses and parks/recreation areas, to hops growers, vineyards, Christmas tree farms, and everything farm-related in-between.
  • Salmon-Safe Wine in the GYW. Salmon-Safe has certified over 350 vineyards in recognition of these growers’ commitments to protect water quality and improve salmon habitat. The Greater Yamhill Watershed has the largest concentration of Salmon-Safe vineyards across the entire PNW! Thank you Salmon-Safe for partnering with our local grape-growers to ensure our vineyards are safe for salmon.
  • Butterfly-Safe Wine. Salmon-Safe is now working with its certified salmon-safe vineyards to protect and improve the oak and prairie habitat needed to recover populations of imperiled fender’s blue butterfly. This pilot project started in 2014 and we hope to see this program incorporated to all of the salmon-safe vineyards in the GYW.
  • The TRWC is a neighboring watershed council working out of Hillsboro. While we haven’t partnered for projects yet, we have worked together to share ideas, resources, and technical assistance. Thank you TRWC for your contributions to watershed health.
  • OFB is state-wide leader focused on public policy and legislation that support working farms and ranches and the wise use of natural resources.
  • The Yamhill County OFB recently sponsored our 2014 Yamhill/Polk Agricultural Pesticide Waste Collection Event, which collected and safely disposed of nearly 40,000 lbs of unwanted and unknown agricultural herbicides, insecticides, fungicides, and other pesticides. Thank you Yamhill County OFB for your support of this important pesticide collection event!
  • YWSF is a local nonprofit promoting public awareness and understanding of the GYW. The YWSF was created by our membership before the GYWC pursued tax-exemption status and has since grown into its own unique organization. Recently, the YWSF has coordinated conservation movie events and provides ongoing small grants that support local watershed education and restoration projects.
  • In 2014, the YWSF recently awarded the GYWC a small grant to support a community-based streamside habitat restoration project along Hess Creek in Newberg in partnership with Ralond and Ruby Troncin (landowners), the City of Newberg, and the Newberg School District. Thank you YWSF for partnering on this community-based restoration projects.